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On 11 March 2019, RUSI’s Strategic Hub for Organised Crime Research (SHOC) convened a workshop exploring the role of academic-law enforcement partnerships in tackling organised crime (OC). Although the important role of the academic community in knowledge creation for law enforcement has long...

Late in 2013 the UK underwent a third major organisational overhaul to further re-invigorate its countering of serious and organised crime. Most far-ranging concerns boil down to the targeting of threats and towards the prioritisation of tasks, in particular the understanding of when, where and...

“Serious organised crime” can be a confusing thing. It is a concept which lumps together such diverse issues as drugs, cybercrime, money laundering and modern slavery; it incorporates everything from highly structured organised crime groups, to urban street gangs and online child exploitation...

Organised criminals are smart. Their primary motivation is profit and they will adapt pretty much anything, including their modus operandi and the commodity they trade in, to ensure a constant cash flow and expansion of their activities.

As organised crime becomes more transnational, we...

With growing evidence pointing to convergence in criminal activities, and the emergence of fluid criminal networks with transient membership, it is time to consider whether the UK’s approach to tackling organised crime is suitably matched to the threats it faces.

In 2014 the...

The bunker-courthouse used in the Maxi Trial, which led to the conviction of 360 mafiosi. Central to Judge Giovanni Falcone's pursuit of the mafia was the principle of 'follow the money'. Courtesy of Wikimedia

Money is power. People will assume that this statement is so obvious it no longer needs repeating. Yet many law enforcement agencies do not seem to have got the message. Money is the crucial element that links organised crime with corrupt officials within governments, financial institutions and...

Anyone familiar with the history of European police and judicial cooperation knows that the arrangements that existed in this area up to the Maastricht Treaty 1992 were a jumble of overlapping, complementary and opaque combinations of legislation. They included not only the mutual assistance...

The traditional ‘pub’ as a site of leisure (and crime)

In bygone eras, the public house (i.e. the ‘local pub’) was a staple of the British social landscape. It was a transitional space for leisure: somewhere to go after work to relax and socialise before heading home. Yet...

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