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The plan to introduce 10 freeports across the UK after Brexit has drawn attention in recent weeks. Introducing these provenly risky ‘special economic zones’ sits uneasily alongside the UK’s wider efforts to ramp up the fight against economic crime. 

Delivering on one of...

The National Strategic Assessment of Serious and Organised crime highlights the growing significance of technology in driving criminal innovation; however, as many police forces struggle to adapt to the digital age, this raises questions about the UK’s ability to tackle the evolving threat....

In the upcoming months, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) will have to rule on a case that could decide the future of the European arrest warrant (EAW) in the UK. The Irish Supreme Court’s (IESC...

Much has been discussed, in recent months, regarding the implications of Brexit for UK law enforcement and how we will continue to conduct the international aspects of intelligence and operations with EU partners. However, little has been said about the impact Brexit will have on drug...

On 11 March 2019, RUSI’s Strategic Hub for Organised Crime Research (SHOC) convened a workshop exploring the role of academic-law enforcement partnerships in tackling organised crime (OC). Although the important role of the academic community in knowledge creation for law enforcement has long...

Late in 2013 the UK underwent a third major organisational overhaul to further re-invigorate its countering of serious and organised crime. Most far-ranging concerns boil down to the targeting of threats and towards the prioritisation of tasks, in particular the understanding of when, where and...

“Serious organised crime” can be a confusing thing. It is a concept which lumps together such diverse issues as drugs, cybercrime, money laundering and modern slavery; it incorporates everything from highly structured organised crime groups, to urban street gangs and online child exploitation...

Organised criminals are smart. Their primary motivation is profit and they will adapt pretty much anything, including their modus operandi and the commodity they trade in, to ensure a constant cash flow and expansion of their activities.

As organised crime becomes more transnational, we...

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