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Crime prevention and criminal justice

Since the 1980s, ‘police encounters’ have been a notorious phenomenon in South Asia, especially in India and Pakistan. Jyoti Belur, who has researched encounters in Mumbai, defines an ‘encounter’ as a ‘specific type of...

South Africa and Mexico face similar security challenges, particularly when it comes to criminal violence. Both governments have responded in a similar fashion for years, by employing joint police-military operations. However, in both countries those operations have repeatedly been unable to...

This is the second of two Informer blogs by Dwight Smith examining how we think about organised crime. The first part was published on Monday 30 July.

Initially, organised...

The conference is focused on ‘Crime and Crime Control: Structures, Developments and Actors’, aiming to bring together criminology experts in order to exchange knowledge and perspectives.

Participants for the plenary talks include: Alison Liebling, Thomas Feltes, Robert Sampson, Manuel...

Amid high expectations, and on a popular mandate to curb violence across the country, Andrés Manuel López Obrador (commonly known as AMLO) won the Mexican presidential election in early July 2018. However, by November, the then president-elect AMLO dismayed some of his electorate by placing the...

The Strategic Hub for Organised Crime Research (SHOC) at RUSI is thrilled to announce the establishment of a new multidisciplinary research and engagement network. The UK-EU Security and Criminal Justice Cooperation Network (JUEST) will work to engage with the design and...

Late in 2013 the UK underwent a third major organisational overhaul to further re-invigorate its countering of serious and organised crime. Most far-ranging concerns boil down to the targeting of threats and towards the prioritisation of tasks, in particular the understanding of when, where and...

This is the first of two Informer blogs by Dwight Smith examining how we think about organised crime. The second part will be published on Thursday 2 August. 

In October 1965, I was designated rapporteur for the Oyster Bay Conferences on Organized Crime, a series (...

Organised criminals are smart. Their primary motivation is profit and they will adapt pretty much anything, including their modus operandi and the commodity they trade in, to ensure a constant cash flow and expansion of their activities.

As organised crime becomes more transnational, we...

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